Every Saturday DUBLIN FOOD CO-OP are hosting an Online Members’ Discussion. It’s a virtual place for our members
to meet up, chat and discuss topics they suggest. We plan
on continuing these meet up during lockdown to help us
feel the support of our community, even when we can’t
see each other in person.

Do you have an idea for the next reading, podcast, or film you’d like to
recommend for our online meet up? Please bring your suggestions
along or email them to info@dublinfood.coop.

30/5/20 – Mondragon Co-operative,
Basque Country

Following on from last week’s discussion we are going to look at Mondragon Co-op
based in the Basque Country. Mondragon is frequently hailed as an important
example for people interested in building a more co-operative economy.

To find out more about Mondragon you can read this short Democracy Collaborative article.

This report by Alex Bird, a Welsh co-operative activist, is written from the point of view
of someone who visited Mondragon co-op.

If you prefer listening to reading this podcast covers the topic well.

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to catch
up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you, please join
us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop and we will send you
a link to the call the day before.

All members are very welcome!

23/5/20 – Socially Valuable Technology

Image: Worcester Radical Films


PLEASE NOTE a change to the originally advertised email address to take
part in this online event. If you’d like to get involved in this chat email
info@dublinfood.coop as normal, with the subject line ‘Online Discussion’.
We will contact our regular attendees to try make sure no-one misses
out due to our mistake.

This week’s discussion will focus on technology and its role within society –
who is it for? Who owns it? What makes something socially valuable?

The Lucas Plan
We are looking in particular at one example from the 1970s that came to be
known as ‘the Lucas Plan’. A group of engineers and workers in Britain put
together an innovative plan to transition the company they worked for
(Lucas Aerospace) into a firm that would produce socially valuable technologies.
The Lucas Plan went on to have a long-standing influence over debates about
sustainability and socially useful production.

We will then be using this example as a way to consider how technology
might be used in the context of the current public health crisis.

We plan to base our discussion on a short documentary on the Lucas Plan,
which you can watch here. You can also read this recent piece from RTE on how
technology is playing a role in the Covid- 19 situation today.

Several new articles have been written about the subject in light of recent events,
you may find others that will be interesting to read. If so please feel free to share
them in our Facebook event for others to read.

If you do not have time to look up the topic in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you,
please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop with
the subject line ‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to
the call the day before.

PLEASE NOTE we mistakenly gave out a new email address for this
group during the week. Our apologies!

All are very welcome.

16/5/20 – In Praise of Idleness

Bertrand Russell
was a British
philosopher,
logician, and
social reformer,
founding figure
in the analytic
movement in
Anglo-American
philosophy,
and recipient
of the Nobel Prize
for Literature in 1950.

If you want to join this discussion – email info@dublinfood.coop with the subject
‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to the call the day before.

This week we will be reading Bertrand Russell’s ‘In Praise of Idleness’. This 1932
essay considers the relationship between leisure and social justice. While lockdown
measures are beginning to slightly loosen and thoughts turn towards what normal
everyday life may look like in the near future it is an apt time to consider human’s
relationship to work and what it means.

You can read the essay here.

Russell’s contributions to logic, epistemology, and the philosophy of mathematics established
him as one of the foremost philosophers of the 20th century. To the general public, however,
he was best known as a campaigner for peace and as a popular writer on social,
political, and moral subjects.

Read more about Bertrand Russell here.

If you don’t have time to read it the essay in advance but feel like you want to catch up
with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you, please join us on Saturday at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion email info@dublinfood.coop with the subject
‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to the call the day before.

All are very welcome.

DFC

9/5/20 – From Crisis to Commons

This Saturday we will be discussing how a crisis can lead to ways in which we all preserve
and protect those things that matter to all of us – such as food, public space and healthcare.
We will be discussing Silvia Federici’s essay ‘Crisis to Commons’. If you like you can read this essay
in advance by downloading it from this link below.

Silvia Federici is a feminist activist, writer, and a teacher. In 1972 she was one of the cofounders of the International Feminist Collective, the organisation that launched the Wages For Housework campaign internationally. Read more about her here.

Dublin Food Co-operative will meet again to discuss ideas and issues related to our current
situation and trying to envisage what a future, more sustainable future might look like.


Can things go back to ‘normal’ after the lockdown is lifted? Should we go back to normal?
In past weeks we have discussed topics that touch on ideas about resources that we all
share in common, ways to better structure our economy, and what are the
advantages of the co-operative model?


We will be thinking about how we might view this new situation and how it might allow us
as a larger community to reassert the values we cherish at Dublin Food Co-operative:
economic democracy, mutualism, and community.


Even if you do not have time to read it the essay in advance but feel like you want to
catch up with other members to discuss the values that matter most to you, please
join us on Saturday 9 May at 2pm.

If you want to join this discussion – email info@dublinfood.coop with the subject
‘Online Discussion’ and we will send you a link to the call the day before.


All our members are very welcome!

. . . . . . . . . .

Do you have an idea for the next reading, podcast, or film you’d like to recommend
for our online meet up? Please bring your suggestions along!

DFC

DFC

2/5/20The Commons

The first member-led online discussion got off to a great start with a diverse mix of members talking about Doughnut Economics by Kate Raworth.

In 2009 Elinor Ostrom won the Nobel Prize for Economics for her work on the commons. She published Governing the Commons in 1990. Ostrom’s work was mentioned in our first discussion last week . This week her ideas will continue our discussion.

“The commons is the cultural and natural resources accessible to all members of a society, including natural materials such as air, water, and a habitable earth. These resources are held in common, not owned privately.”


We will be hosting the second online discussion on the topic of ‘The Commons’ through the lens of Elinor Ostrom who won a Nobel Prize for Economics in 2009 for her work on the subject.


If you want to join this discussion – email with the subject ‘Online Discussion 2’ to info@dublinfood.coop and we will send you a link to the call the day before.


You can access Elinor Ostrom’s Nobel Lecture as a text or video here.

You can find out more about Elinor’s life here.